RhB / Swiss Trains

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 10:51 am 
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Hello all,

As I was browsing through the pictures from Jonothan's trip CD, I noticed that almost all the RhB rolling stock wheels have yellow paint marks. On some cars they appear to be at the quarter points, and on others they look like they are 120deg apart. Are these for some sort of sensor pickup for speed/rotation, or something to do with balancing? I haven't noticed any model rolling stock with these paint marks, though it seems like it might be a neat thing to do.

Keith

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 10:42 pm 
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Hi Keith,

I'm not 100% sure what these register marks are meant for, so maybe someone else can truly enlighten us. I thought the yellow marks might aid rail workers to know when rolling stock is moving. As for models, all of my KISS Gbk-v freights have them painted on the wheels. It looks great when you run a train at moderate to slow speeds. And the models I have all show four yellow marks per wheel, not three. I don't know if I've ever seen three on RhB rolling stock. Maybe it looked this way when you saw a wheel that was actually rotating, instead of a still picture? I know someone here among us has the answers. :smile: :wink:

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Dean


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 09, 2004 10:47 pm 
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Hi guys,

The marks are to give an easy visual indication that the wheel is turning.

Used to be (I guess it still is) that the station master would be standing on the platform checking for hot boxes, blocked wheels, loose loads and other "items" that were out of the ordinary.

BTW there is a distinct brake smell in the air when one of the freights rolls through Filisur on the way to Thusis.

And yes, the Kiss freight cars have the marks on the wheels.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 6:13 am 
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Location: Chur, Switzerland
Sadly the days are long gone when stationmasters would stand at attention in front of their depot and inspect passing trains...Actually I don't know when this requirement was dropped, my guess is around 1980.
The paint marks (you are right, there are four on each wheel) serve to detect blocked wheels in winter. In cold weather the time it takes to release the brakes after a station stop or to run the engine around the train is enough for the warm brakeshoes to melt some snow, and then freeze solidly against the wheels. The yellow marks are renewed every year before winter comes. Orders are for engineers to get the train moving very slowly, the check if it is rolling ok. The train is also watched by the person responsible for the brake test to make sure all the wheels are turning. If you care for prototypical operation, start your train only to walking speed for about fifty metres, then accelerate! Despite all these precautions, you hear more flat spots on the wheels of passenger cars in winter.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 6:15 am 
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Sorry for the triple post. While my computer screen was frozen, I didn't realize the message was already sent and tried again.

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 7:09 am 
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Hi Gion,

Thanks for the details.
I guess with fewer and fewer personnel at the stations that's not surprising.
I remember in '89 they still seemed to do it at Filisur. Of course at that time they didn't have the trains pass in front of their nose on Track 1, either. :wink: :grin:

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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 8:57 am 
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Thanks for the info on the paint marks, everyone.
I was thinking about another possible use for paint on the wheels. If you had a paint that would change colour when it reached a certain temperature, you could tell from a quick visual check if one of the wheels had been overheated by a hot bearing/brake etc.

Keith

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There once was a man with a gavel,
who spent all his time pounding gravel.
It took a long time-he was well past his prime,
but without him the trains couldn't travel.


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 11:33 am 
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Location: East of Spokane, Wa.
Keith,
During the winter months down here, Most of the semi drivers spray paint a mark on all there outside wheels/tires for the same reason.
To see if they havn't iced up or the brakes are frozen.
Don't you guys do that to your equipment?
John


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2004 11:37 am 
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John, I'm in balmy Victoria! No freezing up problems here!
When I lived in Ontario it was definitely a problem, and I spent many a morning lying in the snow upside down trying to get the brakes and other parts to move. We used to leave the gravel crushers run all night just to keep the grease flowable. If we shut them off we would never get them moving again!

Keith

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There once was a man with a gavel,
who spent all his time pounding gravel.
It took a long time-he was well past his prime,
but without him the trains couldn't travel.


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 27, 2014 5:06 pm 
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Hi all,

Well it looks like this is a ten year anniversary resurrection post!

I've been anticipating the arrival of my 20225 Allegra, and thinking about things I want to detail--one of which is adding the yellow 1/4 markings to the wheels. I know the central car has the markings--I've seen lots of pictures confirming that, but I'm unsure of the powered units. A while back Gion sent me a picture of the undercarriage regarding their snowplow height and the wheel of the powered unit in the picture did indeed have a yellow mark. That was the only time I've seen the Allegra powered units with a yellow mark, yet I just discovered them on the wheels of this freshly painted Ge4/4ii in the 125th anniversary scheme:

http://www.xn--rhtische-zeitung-wnb.ch/ ... mslok1.jpg

So is this a change in procedure or is it common for them to get the marks when they go through an overhaul? Or, as Michael M suggested, maybe they are for testing/calibration purposes?

Thanks!
Keith

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There once was a man with a gavel,
who spent all his time pounding gravel.
It took a long time-he was well past his prime,
but without him the trains couldn't travel.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 10:44 am 
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I've just checked photos of 31001 and 31005 taken yesterday, neither appear to have the yellow marks on the wheels.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 28, 2014 12:11 pm 
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If the axles are powered would that be the reason? On a powered axle that was stuck the ammeter would tell the driver something was wrong when he applied power is guess.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 29, 2014 1:34 pm 
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and the lack of pulling power. I had a look at each coach of 3501 and only the middle coach had the yellow marks.
701 on the other hand had yellow marks on the wheels but not the tyres ans a Za wagon had eight sets of marks rather than the normal 4. I have a photo of it.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 2:20 pm 
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Today I looked at 3101 and 3102, one driving coach had the marks, one trailer didn't, can't see any set pattern.


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PostPosted: Thu Jan 30, 2014 7:41 pm 
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Interesting! The mystery continues!

Thanks for the feedback Glenn.

Keith

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There once was a man with a gavel,
who spent all his time pounding gravel.
It took a long time-he was well past his prime,
but without him the trains couldn't travel.


Top
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